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The department's goal is to provide the highest quality of emergency service through prevention, preparedness, response and recovery programs, to promote community awareness and participation in fire prevention and disaster preparedness.

Spring is Here!

The air is warming, the snow is melting and the trees are budding. This means it's time for spring cleaning, yard work & home repairs.… all of which can present a variety of health and safety hazards. These activities are necessary, but also involve a variety of health and safety hazards that can be avoided with the proper precautions. To help ensure our community stays safe this spring season, Lemont Fire District offer the following tips.

CLEANING FOR SAFETY

Nature is undergoing a fresh start and so are homeowners who are ready to clean up the debris that has been accumulating in basements, storage sheds and garages over the winter.

  • Household and pool chemicals, paints and poisons should be properly marked and stored under lock and key, away from children’s reach. Dispose of any that are leaking, expired or that look bad.
  • When cleaning up hazardous chemicals wear rubber gloves and follow the safety directions on the packaging. Never mix chemicals in the same container. If you don’t’ know how to dispose of them, seek outside advice. Never put them into the trash or pour them down the drain.
  • Make sure gasoline and cleaning fluids are well marked and stored in a cool, dry place away from the house and out of the reach of children and pets. Use only approved containers for gasoline storage.
  • Never use gasoline to clean skin, clothes, auto parts or floors.
  •  Clean up work areas. Put dangerous tools, adhesives, matches or other work items away from children’s reach.
  • Check your barbecue grill for leaks and cracks and be sure to store any propane tanks away from your house and garage.
  • Remove all fire hazards, including stacks of rags, newspapers and magazines. Pay special attention to the spaces around your furnace, hot water tank, fireplace, space heaters and dryer, as well as under the stairs.

YARDWORK SAFETY

Itching to get the yard into shape for the summer? Here are ways to help ensure your spring spruce-up is disaster-free

Limber up. Yard chores may seem easy, but they involve muscles you probably haven't used in a while.

  • Always wear protective clothing when you handle pesticides and fertilizers.
  • More than 75,000 people are injured in lawn mowing accidents each year. 10,000 of them are children.

Lawn trimmers, edgers, pruners and power saws also contribute to injuries and death each year.

  • Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for safe operation
  • Inspect the tool for damage. Do NOT use it if there are problems.
  • Use proper eye protection.
  • Make sure blade guards are in place on all cutting equipment.
  • Unplug all tools when not in use.
  • Make sure the tool is in the “off” position before you plug it in.
  • Store gasoline-powered equipment away from potential ignition sources (i.e. pilot light).
  • Make sure you use the right tool for the task at hand.
  • When pruning trees, be careful not to let metal ladders or trimmers contact overhead wires.
    Before you do any hands on weed removal:
  • Make sure you know how to identify poison ivy, sumac, oak and similar toxic plants.
  • Find out ahead of time how to treat the rashes they cause to reduce the irritation.

OUTDOOR SAFETY

Ready for some outdoor exercise and adventure? Here are a few pointers.

  • Winter’s inactive muscles can take only so much strain. Don’t overdo it — build up slowly to help avoid strains that can put you out of commission for some time.
  • It may look appealing, but don’t wander on frozen rivers and lakes in the spring. The ice is beginning to thaw and you never know just how thin the ice really is.
  • Spring’s extra rain and thawing snow can cause normally safe rivers, streams and creeks to turn treacherous. Even standing on banks can be risky as they can be undercut by rushing water and give in under your weight.
  •  Springtime is also severe weather time. If the skies look threatening, check to see if a storm watch or warning has been issued before you initiate outdoor activities. If you’re already outside and thunderstorms threaten, go immediately into a building or enclosed   vehicle. For tornadoes, go to the nearest safe structure or the basement or an interior first-floor room of your home. If there’s no time to follow these precautions, take cover in a ditch or depression in the ground.

LADDER SAFETY

Ready to do some home repairs? More than 90,000 people visit the emergency room each year, because of ladder mishaps. Here are a few safety tips:

  • Inspect the ladder before using it to make sure there are no loose or broken rungs.
  • Make sure the ladder is the right height for the job. Many accidents happen when people overextend their reach because their ladders are too short.
  • Never stand on a ladder’s bucket shelf.
  • Make sure the ladder is completely open and that all of its feet are planted on a firm, level surface. Extension ladders should not be placed at an angle that is too extreme.
  • Avoid using a metal ladder near electrical sources.
  • Face the ladder when climbing and descending.
  • Keep weight centered between the two rails.
  • Maintain three points of contact with the ladder while climbing. Half of all ladder related accidents were due to individuals carrying items as they climbed.

Pool/Water safety for children is everyone's responsibility so we have provided some useful tips to prevent needless tragedies.

  • Know where your children are at all times
  • Know CPR
  • Use an approved barrier to separate the pool from the house
  • Never allow children to be alone near a pool or any water source
  • Have life-saving devices near the pool, such as a pole/hook, or flotation device
  • Keep large objects such as tables, chairs, toys, and ladders away from pool fences
  • Post the 9-1-1 number on the phone
  • Do not allow children to play around the pool and store all toys outside the pool area
  • If you leave the pool area, take the children with you
  • Always have a “designated child watcher”
  • Learn to swim
  • Never swim alone, or while under the influence of alcohol or medications

Learn More

These are just a few of the safety precautions to consider during the spring. It’s also a great time to replace your smoke detector batteries, make sure your fire extinguishers are placed in proper locations around your home and ensure you have a working flashlight and battery-powered radio for spring storms. By taking the right precautions when warmer weather beckons, you and those around you can enjoy a safer, healthier spring.”

My Medical Information

The Lemont Fire Protection District is pleased to provide FREE My Medical Information kits to the senior citizens, those with special needs, and others within the District that may need them.
The kits consist of a red plastic pouch with a magnetic back and are intended to be attached to an individual's refrigerator. Inside the pouch is a cardboard pamphlet that an individual can use to write down his or her personal information, emergency contacts, medications, allergies, medical conditions, and advanced directives. Paramedics can then use this vital information when providing emergency care.

To obtain your FREE My Medical Information kit, contact the Fire Prevention Bureau at (630) 257-0191 or fpb@lemontfire.com. Provide your name and mailing address, and a kit can be mailed to you. You may also stop by Station One, located at 15900 New Ave, Monday thru Friday, from 8:00 AM to 4:00 to pick one up.

         













Press Statements

Lemont Fire District Customer Service Surveys

The Lemont Fire Protection District takes great pride in the service we provide to the community and we are constantly seeking ways to improve our performance. To assist us, we ask that you evaluate our level of performance by completing a short survey for the particular service you received.

Planning Documents

Request A Tour

To request a tour of the Fire Station, contact Joyce at (630) 257-0191 or you can email her at jstanislawski@lemontfire.com

CodeRED Emergency Alerts and Severe Weather Notification

The Village of Lemont offers a way to stay on the pulse of Emergency Alerts and Severe Weather Notification. This program, called CodeRED, is designed to quickly and efficiently deliver targeted emergency notifications and severe weather warnings directly to you by phone. This service is completely voluntary.

You can sign up for CodeRED by visiting the CodeRED website. If you need assistance or have additional questions, please contact the LEMONT POLICE DEPARTMENT at (630) 257-2229. There is no cost for this service.

More Information
Lemont Village

America's #1 Disaster Threat

Home fires kill more Americans than earthquakes, hurricanes, and tornados combined.

Home fires occur every 85 seconds and cause massive harm each day:

  • 7 people die
  • 36 people are injured
  • $18 million in damage to homes

Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Recall Summary

This recall involves Kidde residential smoke alarm model i12010S with manufacture dates between December 18, 2013 and May 13, 2014, combination smoke/CO alarm il2010SCO with manufacture dates between December 30, 2013 and May 13, 2014, and combination smoke/CO alarm model KN-COSM-IBA with manufacture date between October 22, 2013 and May 13, 2014.

Learn More

The Lemont Fire Protection District provides Life Safety services to you and your family

  • Fire Suppression
  • Advanced Life Support Emergency Medical Services
  • Specialized Technical Rescue Teams - Dive, Aerial, Confined Space, Trench
  • Cause and Origin & Arson Investigation Team
  • Fire Prevention Bureau - Fire Inspection & Public Education
  • Hazardous Materials Services

The Lemont Fire District protects an area of approximately 40 square miles and serves the Village of Lemont along with portions of Woodridge, Darien, Bolingbrook, & Homer Glen.

Lemont Fire District Firefighter Eligibility List

Safety information

The nonprofit Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition (HFSC) offers free, non-commercial information about the lifesaving benefits of installing fire sprinkler systems in new one- and two-family homes. Learn more at www.HomeFireSprinkler.org Help children learn about fire safety and the basics of home fire sprinkler protection at www.SprinklerSmarts.org

Get A Smoke Detector

If you are a resident of the Lemont Fire Protection District we may able to supply you with a battery operated smoke detector or replacement battery at no cost.

This program has been made available thanks to funding provided by FEMA working together with the Lemont Fire District Board of Trustees. 

Contact us at 630-257-0191 or email us at jhawthorne@lemontfire.com for information.

Application for a Free Smoke Detector

According to the National Fire Protection Association, between 2003-2006, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms... Learn more

Fires in the US

  • In 2013, there were 1,240,000 fires reported in the United States. These fires caused 3,240 civilian deaths, 15,925 civilian injuries, and $11.5 billion in property damage.
  • 487,500 were structure fires, causing 2,855 civilian deaths, 14,075 civilian injuries, and $9.5 billion in property damage.
  • 188,000 were vehicle fires, causing 320 civilian fire deaths, 1050 civilian fire injuries, and $1.3 billion in property damage.
  • 564,500 were outside and other fires, causing 65 civilian fire deaths, 800 civilian fire injuries, and $607 million in property damage.
  • The 2013 US fire loss clock a fire department respond to a fire every 25 seconds. One structure fire was reported every 65 seconds.
  • One home structure fire was reported every 85 seconds. One civilian fire injury was reported every 33 MINUTES. One civilian fire death occurred every 2 hours and 42 minutes. One outside fire was reported every 56 seconds. One vehicle fire was reported every 167 seconds. NFPA Statistics

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